• SOCIAL STUDIES

    WORLD HISTORY
    5 Credits
    Grade 9
    This is a survey course of World History ranging from the 1700s to the 1990s. This course utilizes both a topical and a chronological approach to the study of world history. Students will examine the geography, governments, history, economics, and cultures of the major regions of the world. The course is also designed to aid students in developing a multicultural view of the world, with an increased awareness of the growing interdependence among people today. The course will concentrate on developing the skills, concepts, and discipline needed for future Social Studies courses, as well as for making informed decisions regarding complex issues that face the world in the 21st Century. Students will analyze a variety of primary and secondary source readings, complete a writing assignment every marking period, and write a research paper.

    *Academic course level (College Prep, Essentials, Adaptive) will be based on teacher recommendation

    Prerequisite: None 

    WORLD HISTORY HONORS
    5 Credits
    Grade 9
    The Honors World History program is designed to challenge motivated students and provide them with an in-depth understanding of world history and its connection to present-day events. The class will require more in-depth research and academic work than a regular World History section, and will focus on improving the student’s verbal communication, critical-thinking techniques, note taking and outlining skills, research skills, reading and writing ability, and capacity to interpret and analyze primary source materials. This will be accomplished through a variety of methods including research projects, document-based essays, oral presentations, book reviews, written projects, visual projects, reaction papers, and the study of current events.

    Prerequisite: Sending district recommendation and passing grade on the Passaic Valley designated placement test  

    U.S. HISTORY I
    5 Credits
    Grade 10
    This is a survey course of American History ranging from colonial times up to and including the era of the rise of big business in the 1890s. This course utilizes both a topical and a chronological approach to the study of America. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, deduction, and the understanding on the students’ part of their rights and responsibilities within the American system. The course will concentrate on developing the skills, concepts, and discipline needed for future Social Studies courses, as well as for making informed decisions regarding complex issues that face the U.S. in the 21st Century. Students will analyze a variety of primary and secondary source readings, complete a writing assignment every marking period, and write a research paper.

    *Academic course level (College Prep, Essentials, Adaptive) will be based on teacher recommendation Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History at the appropriate academic level

    U.S. HISTORY I HONORS
    5 Credits
    Grade 10
    Honors U.S. History is designed to challenge motivated students and provide them with an in-depth understanding of American History and its connection to present-day events. The class will require more in-depth research and academic work than a regular U.S. History section and will focus on improving the student’s verbal communication, critical-thinking techniques, note taking and outlining skills, research skills, reading and writing ability, and capacity to interpret and analyze primary source materials. This will be accomplished through a variety of methods including research projects, document-based essays, oral presentations, book reviews, written projects, visual projects, reaction papers, and the study of current events.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History Honors with a final average of no less than a B+ (87-89) or World History with an A (93 or above); Instructor recommendation 

    U.S. HISTORY II
    5 Credits
    Grade 11
    This is a survey course of American History ranging from the 1890s to the 1990s. This course utilizes both a topical and a chronological approach to the study of America. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, deduction, and the understanding on the students’ part of their rights and responsibilities within the American system. The course will concentrate on developing the skills, concepts, and discipline needed for future Social Studies courses, as well as for making informed decisions regarding complex issues that face the U.S. in the 21st Century. Students will analyze a variety of primary and secondary source readings, complete a writing assignment every marking period, and write a research paper.

    *Academic course level (College Prep, Essentials, Adaptive) will be based on teacher recommendation

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I at the appropriate academic level

    U.S. HISTORY II HONORS
    5 Credits
    Grade 11
    The Honors U.S. History program is designed to challenge motivated students and provide them with an in-depth understanding of American History and its connection to present-day events. The class will require more in-depth research and academic work than a regular U.S. History section, and will focus on improving the student’s verbal communication, critical-thinking techniques, note taking and outlining skills, research skills, reading and writing ability, and capacity to interpret and analyze primary source materials.  This will be accomplished through a variety of methods including research projects, document-based essays, oral presentations, book reviews, written projects, visual projects, reaction papers, and the study of current events.  Content areas to be covered include:

    *Students in this course are eligible to participate in dual enrollment with Fairleigh Dickinson University.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I Honors with a final average of no less than a B+ (87-89) or U.S. History I with an A (93 or above); Instructor recommendation. 

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
    5 Credits
    Grades 10-12
    Geography answers the questions, Why are things where they are? And so what? Human Geography is the branch of the subject that deals with the study of people and their communities, cultures, economies, and interactions with the environment. Always, the focus is on answering questions and solving problems based on spatial relationships.  AP Human Geography, a college level course, introduces students to the systematic study of human patterns of social interaction. Why are borders where they are? What influences the spatial distribution of culture, language, and religion? How do people live their lives in different places and--importantly--how does place influence our lives? Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum reflects the goals of the National Geography Standards (2012). Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam in May.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors World History, U.S. I or U.S. II with a final average of an A (93 or above) or World History H or U.S. I H or U.S. II H with a B+ (87-89); Instructor recommendation

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. HISTORY
    5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    The A.P. United States History course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full- year introductory college courses. Students will learn to assess historical materials – their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance – and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. A.P. United States History will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgement and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. The A.P. course in U.S. History is intended for motivated students who wish to complete classes while in secondary school equivalent to college introductory courses in U.S. History. There will be a heavy emphasis in this course on reading, writing, and the interpretation of both primary and secondary- source documents. Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam in May.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I/II Honors with a final average of no less than a B+ (87-89) or U.S. History I/II with an A (93 or above); Instructor recommendation 

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
    5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    The AP United States Government and Politics course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of the general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics, and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam in May.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I/II Honors with a final average of no less than a B+ (87-89) or U.S. History I/II with an A (93 or above); Instructor recommendation 

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY
    5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas. Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam in May.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I/II Honors with a final average of no less than a B+ (87-89) or U.S. History I/II with an A (93 or above); Instructor recommendation

    THE HOLOCAUST, GENOCIDE, AND MODERN HUMANITY
    5 Credits
    Grade 12
    The first half of this full-year, college-level, elective course will critically examine both historical and contemporary acts of genocide and “ethnic cleansing” around the world, as well as the psychological and social roots of racism and prejudice.  The second half of the course will analyze and evaluate the causes, events, and consequences of the Holocaust – Nazi Germany’s attempt to implement the “Final Solution” against the Jewish population of Europe between 1933 and 1945.

    *Students in this course are eligible to participate in dual enrollment with Kean University.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History II

    HUMAN BEHAVIOR
    5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    One of the basic elements of life as a human being is interacting with other people; the key to a person thriving in social settings then is to understand others as well as you understand yourself. The social science course of human behavior serves as an introduction to the discipline of psychology and allows the student to gain a better sense of human thinking, emotions, and actions. There will be an opportunity for students to gain personal awareness in the areas of assertiveness, creativity, human motives, and reasoning.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I

    SOCIOLOGY
    2.5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    The social science course of Sociology focuses on patterns of human behavior.  Specifically, Sociology examines human groups and institutions, and the cause and effect these groups and institutions have on social issues and problems in American society.  The core of the class deals critically with culture and human actions. There is a strong emphasis on reading, writing, and reaction and opinion-based topics, as well as the study of current events.

    *This course will alternate yearly with Sports and American Society and will not run again until 2020-21.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I 

    SPORTS AND AMERICAN SOCIETY
    2.5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    Sports have become a microcosm for American society and culture, and have come to reflect the major trends, frustrations, fantasies, and values in the society at large.  Studying about sports in any time period gives extraordinary insight into the mind and mood of the people. The fact that three-quarters of the American people daily participate in, watch in person or on TV, talk to their friends, or read about sporting events indicates that sports pervades every facet of American life.  Sports infiltrate the educational system, the economy, and the political life of our country, and have become the most popular form of mass entertainment. Students will come to recognize the parallels that exist between sports and society. *This course will alternate yearly with Sociology and will run in 2019-2020.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I

    CONTEMPORARY ISSUES THROUGH VIDEOCONFERENCING
    5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    Through a vital global perspective, students will gain the skills for productive problem solving and decision-making.  The refinement of these skills is aimed at preparing students to become effective and responsible contributors at the individual, community, state, national, and international levels.  This course is designed for students who are interested in global and national issues and/or a career in educational technology. This course involves methods for implementing current educational technology into the curriculum through project-based learning, video- conferencing, interactive virtual field trips, formal instruction, and dialogues with students and teachers from around the country and the world.

    *This course can be used to meet the 21st Century Skills/Career requirement for graduation.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I; Instructor recommendation/application required 

    Criminal Justice

    INTRODUCTION TO LAW
    2.5 Credits
    Grades 10-12
    This course is a study of common-law heritage, constitutional, civil, and   criminal law, as well as law of evidence, courts, and civil and criminal law procedures. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to differentiate between criminal and civil law, explain the difference between case law and statutory law, describe how the phrase ‘separate but equal’ was applied in the case of Plessy v. Ferguson and describe the tiered structure of the Federal Court System.

    *Students in this course are eligible to participate in dual enrollment with Passaic County Community College.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History; Instructor recommendation

    INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE
    2.5 Credits
    Grades 10-12
    This course focuses on the study of law enforcement agencies, their role, function, history, and development within the field of criminal justice.  Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to explain the structure of the American criminal justice system, explain the purpose of law, explain the police mission in a democratic society, and explain how the Bill of Rights and subsequent laws help protect personal freedom in society.

    *Students in this course are eligible to participate in dual enrollment with Passaic County Community College.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History; Instructor recommendation

    JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND YOUTH CRIME
    2.5 Credits
    Grades 10-12
    This course covers the major factors contributing to offenses committed by juveniles and younger offenders, society’s response to the problem of delinquency, and how youth crime is treated. Family Court provisions and criminal procedure laws relating to youthful offenders are also addressed.  Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to differentiate between delinquent behavior and criminal behavior describe the factors that affect the juvenile crime rate describe the Routine Activities Theory of delinquency and describe the principles underlying Social Disorganization Theory.

    *Students in this course are eligible to participate in dual enrollment with Passaic County Community College.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History; Instructor recommendation

    INVESTIGATIVE FUNCTIONS
    2.5 Credits
    Grades 10-12
    This course covers the techniques and procedures of criminal investigation, the methods of crime prevention, and the use and acceptance of informants and electronic surveillance. Topics include information retrieval, recognition, development and preservation of material evidence, and interview and interrogation techniques. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the basic goals of criminal investigations, describe why reports are important to a successful investigation and explain what the Exclusionary Rule is and how it affects criminal investigators and describe the four, basic means of identifying a suspect.

    *Students in this course are eligible to participate in dual enrollment with Passaic County Community College.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History; Instructor recommendation